Group: Texas naval base shooter supported clerics

The suspect killed during what the FBI is calling a “terrorism-related” attack at a Texas naval air base voiced support for hard-line clerics, according to a group that monitors online activity of jihadists.

The attack Thursday at Naval Air Station Corpus Christi wounded a sailor and left the gunman dead. The gunman was identified on Friday by the FBI as 20-year-old Adam Salim Alsahli of Corpus Christi. He had been a business major at a local community college.

The gunman tried to speed through a security gate at Naval Air Station Corpus Christi, opening fire and wounding the sailor, a member of base security, U.S. officials told the AP. But she was able to roll over and hit a switch that raised a barrier, preventing the man from getting onto the base.

Nearly 39 million have lost jobs since virus took hold

WASHINGTON — The number of Americans applying for unemployment benefits in the two months since the coronavirus took hold in the U.S. has swelled to nearly 39 million, the government reported Thursday, even as states from coast to coast gradually reopen their economies and let people go back to work.

More than 2.4 million people filed for unemployment last week in the latest wave of layoffs from the business shutdowns that have brought the economy to its knees, the Labor Department said. That brings the running total to a staggering 38.6 million, a job-market collapse unprecedented in its speed.

Judge nixes bid to stop coal sales Trump revived

BILLINGS, Mont. — A judge threw out a lawsuit on Friday from a coalition of states, environmental groups and American Indians which sought to revive an Obama-era moratorium against U.S. government coal sales on public lands in the West.

U.S. District Judge Brian Morris said President Donald Trump’s administration had fixed its initial failure to consider the environmental impacts of ending the moratorium.

The administration’s opponents had argued it did not look closely enough at climate change and other effects from burning coal when it did an environmental analysis of the government’s coal program.

Trump pledged to end the moratorium prior to being elected and in office has sought to boost the industry, despite market forces that have sharply curtailed mining.

Missing mother’s family haunted by ‘inhumanity’

NEW CANAAN, Conn. — Relatives of a mother of five who disappeared nearly a year ago said Friday that they are haunted by the “brutality and inhumanity” of her death and urged support for victims of intimate partner violence.

Jennifer Dulos, of Connecticut, disappeared May 24, 2019, after dropping off her and Fotis Dulos’ five children at school in New Canaan.

At the time, she and Fotis Dulos were mired in contentious divorce and child custody proceedings. Fotis Dulos was accused of killing her at her home, but he took his own life in January as he awaited trial.

In a statement on behalf of Jennifer Dulos’ family, Carrie Luft said that the couple’s children are healthy and well as they are raised by Jennifer’s mother, Gloria Farber, in New York.

First piece of Keystone XL oil sands pipeline finished

BILLINGS, Mont. — A Canadian company has built the first piece of the disputed Keystone XL oil sands pipeline across the U.S. border and started work on labor camps in Montana and South Dakota.

But it has not resolved a courtroom setback that would make it hard to finish the $8 billion project.

The 1,200-mile pipeline from Alberta to Nebraska was stalled for much of the past decade before President Donald Trump was elected and began trying to push it through to completion.

Environmentalists and Native American tribes are bitterly opposed to the line because of worries over oil spills and that burning the fuel would make climate change worse.

— The Associated Press